Session 3: The Art of Negotiation

Date: December 01, 2017
Location: City Market at O, Rooftop Lounge – 800 P St NW
Led by: David Kaplan and Adam Crain
Venue Sponsor: City Market at O

Overview
In this year’s third CKLDP session, David Kaplan and Adam Crain organized an event on The Art of Negotiation featuring three compelling presentations. Michael Hraber started the afternoon speaking from his experience working with architects from the perspective of an insurance broker. This presentation focused on managing risk and role of contracts in that process. Following that presentation, Meredith Moldenhauer spoke to the scholars about her experience leading architects and clients through various approval processes. She shared strategies for negotiating with neighbors, councilmembers, ANC’s, and various other stakeholders that may initially oppose a project. After a short break the scholars were led on a building tour of City Market at O by architects Joe Corridore and Andrew Taylor from Shalom Baranes. The final presentation was led by Tiana Russel, an attorney at the Department of Justice, which taught scholars negotiation tactics though a series of bargaining simulations. After each simulation, Tiana broke down the critical steps that lead to a persuasive argument and successful negotiation.


Presentation #1 – Risk Drivers & Contractual Pitfalls in the Practice of Architecture
Michael Hraber, an insurance broker at CBIZ, spoke to the scholars about lessons learned from his experience working directly with architects. He explained the concept of risk; strategies for avoiding, transferring, assuming or controlling that risk. These concepts were further developed by reviewing historical insurance claim data broken out by project type. Following this discussion, Michael went on to present various owner-architect contract types. While the AIA contracts are preferred, owners often strategically modify these contracts or provide contracts of their own that can leave the design team exposed if the risk is not properly managed.


Presentation #2 – Zone, Development & Community Engagement
Meredith Moldenhauer is a lawyer who utilizes strategic negotiations to lead architects and clients through various approval processes. She opened by debunking several common myths of negotiation which led into discussion on the importance of compromise. In DC there are a host of regulatory agencies, neighbors, and other critical stakeholders that often oppose your project and the architect should clearly demonstrate how successive designs compromise by responding to stakeholder feedback. Responding to these concerns can be done creatively by considering a wide range of negotiation issues; materials, height, use, or even construction timeline. Meredith went on to emphasize the role of overdesign in project development. Successful projects build in margin that allow room for negotiating down to the bottom line during public review processes.

Tour of City Market at O
The afternoon’s series of presentations was punctuated by a building tour of City Market at O by the design architects Joe Corridore and Andrew Taylor of Shalom Baranes. Scholars were taken though around the buildings, though the grocery store, and even into an apartment unit. The tour included fascinating stories about the design and construction process that led to the successful completion of the project.


Presentation #3 – Techniques and Process of Negotiation
The last presentation of the day was led by Tiana Russel, an attorney at the Department of Justice, which taught scholars strategies for negotiation through a series of bargaining simulations. Scholars were broken up into groups of two, each member was given a separate set of instructions which initiated a series of negotiations. After each simulation, Tiana spoke about the conversation mechanics that lead to a successful negotiation. Scholars went on to perform additional bargaining simulations, further refining their body language and ability to construct persuasive arguments.

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2017 Call for Applications

OVERVIEW

In 2013 the AIA|DC Chapter established a program to help train and develop the next generation of architectural leaders.  Demonstrating sustained success since its inception, the Christopher Kelley Leadership Development Program looks to continue this trend by calling for applications to the 2017 class.

The year-long program consists of nine monthly half-day sessions attended by a competitively selected group of sixteen emerging professionals – defined as someone who has earned a degree in architecture and is within ten years of their first licensure.  Prospective participants will go through an application process for selection through which they must demonstrate proven career success, community involvement, and full support by their firm/agency.

CURRICULUM

The CKLDP focuses on core professional skills, such as: entrepreneurship and firm management; teamwork and collaboration; negotiation skills; client development; community leadership; understanding industry trends, and; developing your future within the practice.  The selected scholars to CKLDP will plan and participate in each of the sessions.  The program is kicked off with a “Boot Camp” session to introduce the participants and develop the curriculum for the year.

APPLICATION

Applications for the Program are due by Monday June 26th 2017 at 11:59 pm. To apply, visit the following link: Application Link
Please have the agreement completed (Agreement Link) and ready for upload.

If you are applying for tuition assistance, please visit the following link and fill out the form along with your application: Tuition Assistance Link

Want to learn more before you submit your application?

CKLDP Applications 101 is on June 5th 2017 from 6:30pm-8:00pm @ HKS (1250 Eye St NW Suite 600).. The CKLDP 2017-2018 Selection Committee will discuss the benefits of participating in CKLDP and how to successfully apply. Register and find out more via the following link: http://www.aiadc.com/event/ckldp-applications-101.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the difference between a Letter of Nomination and Letter of Recommendation?

Letter of Nomination – a letter of nomination should come from someone who is familiar with the program and Institute as a whole, as well as the applicant themselves. The letter should address specific leadership skills that the candidate will bring to the program, as well as what the candidate expects to gain from the program. The nomination letter should also explain why the author and/or author’s firm see the candidate as a current and/or future leader. A self-nomination letter from the applicant is also acceptable, but note that self-nominations are highly encouraged to provide additional letters of recommendations as support.

Letter of Recommendation
– a letter of recommendation speaks to the leadership character of the applicant. Individual and specific stories are shared, which reinforce both the personal qualities and professional traits of the applicant. Letters of recommendation are encouraged to be provided by others who have worked closely with the applicant, but do not have to be from within the industry (church, university, client, contractor, coach, etc.).

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

The Fifth Year sessions will be held monthly from 12:00pm – 5:00pm, September 2017 through May 2018. You can find more information here.  Please contact Kate Renner (Chair) & Ricardo J. Rodríguez (Past-Chair) if you have any questions.

Call for Applications

Overview: In 2013 the AIA|DC Chapter established a program to help train and develop the next generation of architectural leaders.  Demonstrating sustained success since its inception, the Christopher Kelley Leadership Development Program looks to continue this trend by calling for applications to the 2017 class.

The year-long program consists of nine monthly half-day sessions attended by a competitively selected group of sixteen emerging professionals – defined as someone who has earned a degree in architecture and is within ten years of their first licensure.  Prospective participants will go through an application process for selection through which they must demonstrate proven career success, community involvement, and full support by their firm/agency.

Curriculum:  The CKLDP focuses on core professional skills, such as: entrepreneurship and firm management; teamwork and collaboration; negotiation skills; client development; community leadership; understanding industry trends, and; developing your future within the practice.  The selected scholars to CKLDP will plan and participate in each of the sessions.  The program is kicked off with a “Boot Camp” session to introduce the participants and develop the curriculum for the year.

Schedule:

  • There will be an “Applications 101” Workshop held on June 8th 2016 @ Hickok Cole Architects. The discussion will provide potential scholars with tips for developing successful applications.You can find more information hereRegister online via this link.
  • Applications for the Program are due by June 20th at 11:59 pm. 

For information on the submission requirements and to upload your application please visit this link.

The Fourth Year sessions will be held monthly from 12:00pm – 5:00pm, September 2016 through May 2017. You can find more information here.  Please contact Ricardo J. Rodríguez (Chair) & Aimee Woodall (Past-Chair) if you have any questions.

 

CKLDP Workshop Flyer Page 002

Learn More About the AIA|DC CKLDP

Interested in a brief overview of the program but don’t have time to read through the session summaries?  Don’t worry, we got you covered.  Check out the PDF below or the Prezi animation for a quick recap.